Day 171: Mount Madison

16,74 km (10.4 miles)
1872.2 / 2189.8 miles
Stealth campsite, NH

https://youtu.be/IxTbSJT1JAw

“Just waking up in the morning
And to be well,
Quite honest with ya,
I ain’t really sleep well
Ya ever feel like your train of thought’s been derailed?
That’s when you press on – Lee nails
Half the population’s just waitin to see me fail
Yeah right, you’re better off trying to freeze hell
Some of us do it for the females
And others do it for the retail

But I do it for the kids, life threw the towel in on
Every time you fall it’s only making your chin strong
And I’ll be in your corner like Mick, baby, ’til the end
Or when you hear a song from that big lady”
-Gym Class Heroes
(Fighter, 2012)

With the strong wind beating on my tent through the night I barely slept at all. I did trust that my Akto would be able to take the wind, but the noise kept me awake. In the morning my brains were in completely frozen state after two sleepless nights.

While I was going through my morning routine there was two short rain showers. I peaked out of my tent just to learn that all the mountains that I was able to see yesterday and pretty much everything else further than 20 m (65 ft) from me had disappeared inside the cloud. The wind was very strong and I was especially careful taking down my tent – even though I wasn’t in Atlanta anymore, it could have been easily gone with the wind. I kept the tent attached to my backpack or to me or both all the time.

The swelling in my feet was gone and I had changed my socks thinking that possibly chafing seam wouldn’t be at the exactly same spot. My toes were still sore after yesterday, but my feet fit into my shoes and nothing was rubbing. My decision to bivy, emergency camp, seemed right.

Also my choice of camping at the hillside proved to be good. When I descended to Edmands Col it had really changed into a wind tunnel. I was barely able to stand. The wind was waving me like a rag, my clothes were rattling against my body and the humidity densified into small ice crystals on the surface of my down jacket. I felt like someone would have tied me on the top of their car and would be speeding down the highway. I was leaning against the wind, took support from my trekking poles on every step and was thankful of every single gram that I carried in my backpack. Walking through those strong gusts of wind was like riding on a roller coaster and I was spontaneously shouting for joy.

From the whiteout materialised a bearded man, who was walking towards me. This happy hiker shouted that he was Odie, the editor of the Hiker Yearbook. I shouted back that we had met months ago in south and I showed him the bracelet that he gave me. Odie reminded me to send my photo for the Hiker Yearbook when I was done with the trail.

When I arrived to the intersection of multiple trails I had to stop for a while to make sure that I was taking the right trail. While I was standing there I saw a figure coming through the clouds. This unclear figure seemed somehow familiar and finally I was able to recognise him as Mojo. He had stayed the night at a shelter that was a bit further off the AT. We started to hike together downhill towards the Madison Spring Hut.

At the hut the croo was still cleaning up after the breakfast, so there was no lunch soup yet, but some pretty dry coffee cake anyway. I heard that the croo had allowed many hikers to camp outside the hut last night. It seemed like I wasn’t the only one who had been struggling. From the weather forecasts I finally learned that the wind today was 65-80 km/h or 18-22 m/s (40-50 mph) with 100 km/h or 27 m/s (60 mph) gusts. My gut feeling of the highway speeds wasn’t that inaccurate. The forecast was showing that the weather should clear out in the afternoon.

There was still the climb to the Mount Madison before I was going to finish the Presidential traverse for good. Tailing Mojo I started to push myself once again against the wind and uphill. Every once in a while the clouds started to open, but the wind was still strong. When I reached the summit I had to really balance on the rocky ridge in order not to be knocked down by the wind.

When I got to the downhill the wind was finally easing up. Slowly the fine view to Pinkham Notch started to open in front of me as I got myself below the clouds. It was also getting warmer as I proceeded to lower elevation. I was able take off my down jacket and beanie when the sun finally found me.

The beginning of the downhill was quite steep, but it changed more gentle. Still it was steep enough that I had to keep on looking at my feet all the time. This is why I didn’t see a tree that had fallen over the trail. The trunk of the tree was high enough that it didn’t cause me any danger. But from that trunk there was poking stumps of branches that had been cut and one of them pointed straight at me. I didn’t notice this until the stump hit first on my forehead and then it smashed my glasses to my face. I stopped to evaluate my injuries. Forehead was throbbing and there would be a bump. My glasses were a bit bent, but not broken. I realised that was I not wearing my glasses the branch would have landed straight into my eye. And I would have lost an eye.

Soon after this incident the terrain started to get more flat and first time in a long while I got my good hiking speed on. I was content having the Presidentials behind me and my hiking-confidence seemed to be growing.

Coming to Pinkham Notch I saw Mojo sitting close to the Visitor Center. I heard that the dinner buffet there was expensive, but the store had some snacks available. I grabbed a few chocolate bars for nothing else felt inviting. As I stepped out I saw another friend – AT-AT Walker had decided to stay the night at the hostel next to the Visitor Center. She had already had a chance to take a shower and to change some clean clothes on and she was looking like a normal person. Or maybe even attractive. We were talking for a while and I told her that I was planning to hike on and trying to find a tent site. We thought that we might meet again soon for she was an early riser and might catch me up in the morning.

Me and Mojo started to climb the very steep hill up from Pinkham Notch towards the Wildcat Mountain. The dusk was crawling in when we tried to find tent sites near some outlooks. We found a spot where there was space for one tent and I offered it to Mojo, but he decided to continue on with me. On the next outlook we found another site that had enough space for my tent, but not for Mojo’s larger footprint. It was already dark and I asked Mojo if he was comfortable with me staying here. He didn’t mind and I started to put up my tent as he hiked on. On the last two nights my tent sites had been downright horrible, so I was extremely happy to get to sleep on an even surface.

JFRM-2017-08-0433.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0434.jpg

JFRM-2017-08-0436.jpg
Mojo rising
Mojo nousee

JFRM-2017-08-0445-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0452.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0453.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0454.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0455.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0456.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0458.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0459.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0461-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0467-Pano.jpg

“Just waking up in the morning
And to be well,
Quite honest with ya,
I ain’t really sleep well
Ya ever feel like your train of thought’s been derailed?
That’s when you press on – Lee nails
Half the population’s just waitin to see me fail
Yeah right, you’re better off trying to freeze hell
Some of us do it for the females
And others do it for the retail

But I do it for the kids, life threw the towel in on
Every time you fall it’s only making your chin strong
And I’ll be in your corner like Mick, baby, ’til the end
Or when you hear a song from that big lady”
-Gym Class Heroes
(Fighter, 2012)

Voimakkaan tuulen hakatessa telttaani koko yön sain tuskin nukuttua. Luotin kyllä Akton pysyvän pystyssä, mutta meteli oli häiritsevä. Aamulla aivot olivatkin aivan kohmeessa kahden huonosti nukutun yön jälkeen.

Tehdessäni aamutoimia tuli kaksi lyhyttä sadekuuroa. Vilkaisu ulos teltasta kertoi, että vielä illalla näkyneet vuoret ja itseasiassa kaikki lähimmän parinkymmenen metrin sädettä kauempana olevat asiat olivat kadonneet pilven sisälle. Tuuli oli voimakas ja noudatin erityistä varovaisuutta purkaessani telttaa, ettei se olisi lentänyt matkoihinsa. Teltta oli jatkuvasti kiinntettynä reppuun tai minuun ja suurimman osan ajasta molempiin.

Jalkojen turvotus tuntui laskeneen ja olin vaihtanut toiset sukat sillä ajatuksella, että mahdollisen sauman hiertäminen ei osuisi samaan kohtaan. Varpaat olivat vielä hellänä eilisen raastamisen jäljiltä, mutta nyt ne tuntuivat mahtuvan kenkiin ja mikään ei hiertänyt. Päätköseni bivittää, hätämajoittua, oli siis ollut oikea.

Samoin oikeaksi osoittautui telttapaikkani valinta rinteessä. Laskeutuessani Edmands Coliin se oli todellakin muuttunut tuulitunneliksi. Pysyin hädin tuskin pystyssä. Tuuli riepotti minua kuin rättiä, vaatteet räpättivät tuulessa vasten kehoani ja ilmassa oleva kosteus tiivistyi pieniksi jääkiteiksi takkini pintaan. Tuntui kuin joku olisi sitonut minut auton katolle ja ajanut täyttä vauhtia moottoritiellä. Nojasin tuulta vasten, otin joka askeleella tukea vaellussauvoistani ja olin kiitollinen jokaikisestä grammasta, jonka reppuni painoi. Voimakkaiden puuskien keskellä käveleminen oli kuin vuoristoratakyytiä ja huusin spontaanisti riemusta.

Näkyvyyden peittävän pilven seasta materialisoitu vastaan tuleva parrakas mies. Iloisella tuulella oleva vaeltaja huusi olevansa Odie, Hiker Yearbookin tekijä. Huusin hänelle takaisin, että olimme tavanneet kuukausia aiemmin etelässä ja näytin häneltä saamani rannekkeen. Odie muistutti minua lähettämään kuvani Hiker Yearbookiin, kun pääsen perille.

Tullessani useamman polun risteykseen pysähdyin hetkeksi varmistaakseni lähteväni oikeaan suuntaan. Siinä seistessäni alkoi pilvien seasta erottua hahmo, joka tuli toista polkua pitkin minua kohti. Epäselvä hahmo näytti jotenkin tutulta ja lopulta tunnistinkin sen olevan Mojo. Hän oli ollut yötä jonkin verran AT:lta sivussa olevalla shelterillä. Lähdimme yhdessä kulkemaan alamäkeen kohti Madison Spring Hutia.

Majalla siivoiltiin vielä aamiaisen jäljiltä, joten lounaskeittoa ei ollut tarjolla, mutta hieman kuivahtanutta kahvikakkua kuitenkin. Kuulin monien vaeltajien telttailleen majan pihalla luvan kanssa, koska ilmeisesti muutkin olivat kohdanneet haasteita laskeutuessaan Presidentialsilta. Sääennusteista sain viimein tietää tuulennopeuden olleen 65-80 km/h eli 18-22 m/s (40-50 mph) ja puuskissa 100 km/h eli 27 m/s (60 mph). Tunteeni moottoritienopeuksista ei siis ollut kovin väärässä. Ennusteiden mukaan sää oli kuitenkin kirkastumaan päin.

Edessä oli vielä nousu Mount Madisonille ennen kuin pääsisin lopullisesti laskeutumaan alas Presidentialseilta. Lähdin Mojon perässä puskemaan taas kerran tuulta vastaan ja ylämäkeen. Hetkittäin pilvet alkoivat jo avautua paikoittain, mutta tuuli oli yhä voimakasta. Saavuttaessani huipun sain todella tasapainoilla kivikkoisella harjanteella etten olisi kaatunut tuulen voimasta.

Alamäkeen päästyäni tuulen vaikutus alkoi viimein helpottaa ja pikku hiljaa päästyäni pilvien alapuolelle alkoi eteeni avautua hieno näkymä Pinkham Notchin suuntaan. Ilma alkoi myös tuntua lämpimämmältä päästyäni alemmas sekä tuulen taannuttua. Saatoin viimein riisua untuvatakin ja pipon auringon alkaessa lämmittää.

Aluksi alamäki oli jyrkempää, mutta se loiveni hieman edetessäni kohti Pinkham Notchia. Sen verran jyrkkää mäki kuitenkin oli, että jouduin katsomaan jatkuvasti jalkoihini kävellessäni. Tämän vuoksi en huomannutkaan polun ylle kaatunutta puuta. Itse puun runko oli poikittain polun yläpuolella ja niin korkealla, ettei siitä ollut minulle vaaraa. Rungosta törötti kuitenkin sahattuja oksantynkiä moneen suuntaan ja yksi suoraan kohti minua. En huomannut tätä ennen kuin oksantynkä jysähti ensin otsaani ja iski sitten silmälasit kasvojani vasten. Pysähdyin tutkimaan vammoja. Otsassa tykytti ja siihen nousisi kuhmu. Silmälasit olivat hieman vääntyneet, mutta ehjät. Tajusin, että jos minulla ei olisi ollut laseja päässä olisi oksa osunut aivan suoraan minua silmään. Ja minulla olisi nyt yksi silmä vähemmän.

Pian tämän tapahtuman jälkeen maasto alkoi vihdoin muuttua tasaisemmaksi ja pääsin pitkästä aikaa taas hyvään vauhtiin. Olin tyytyväinen saatuani Presidentialsit selätettyä ja uskoni omaan vaeltamiseeni tuntui taas kasvavan.

Saapuessani Pinkham Notchiin näin Visitor Centerin pihalla istumassa Mojon. Sain kuulla illallisbuffetin olevan melko kallis, mutta Visitor Centerin kaupassa olisi kuulemma jotain syötävää saatavilla. Kävin hakemassa muutaman suklaapatukan, mutta muuta kiinnostavaa tarjolla ei oikeastaan ollut. Tullessani ulos näin toisenkin tutun, sillä AT-AT Walker oli päättänyt yöpyä viereisessä hostellissa. Hän oli ehtinyt jo käydä suihkussa ja vaihtaa puhtaat vaatteet päällensä, joten hän näytti aivan normaalilta ihmiseltä. Ellei jopa viehättävältä. Keskustelimme hetken aikaa ja kerroin aikovani itse jatkaa vielä jonkun matkaa ja etsiväni sitten telttapaikan. Arvelimme tapaavamme taas pian, koska AT-AT Walker aikaisena herääjänä ottaisi minut todennäköisesti aamulla kiinni.

Lähdin yhdessä Mojon kanssa nousemaan Pinkham Notchista hyvin jyrkkää rinnettä kohti Wildcat Mountainia. Hämärä alkoi jo tulla, kun etsimme ylämäessä olevien näköalapaikkojen läheltä tilaa teltoille. Löysimme paikan, jossa oli tilaa yhdelle teltalle, joten tarjosin sitä Mojolle. Hän kuitenkin päätti jatkaa vielä eteenpäin kanssani. Seuraavalle tasanteelle päästyämme löysimme toisen telttapaikan, johon oma telttani mahtuisi hyvin, mutta Mojon isommalle teltalle ei ollut kunnolla tilaa. Oli jo pimeä, joten kysyin Mojolta haittaisiko häntä, jos jäisin tähän. Hän ei pannut pahakseen, joten ryhdyin teltanpystytyspuuhiin Mojon jatkaessa matkaa. Kahden edellisen yön telttapaikkani olivat olleet perin surkeita, joten olin harvinaisen tyytyväinen saadessani vihdoinkin nukkua tasaisella pinnalla.

Map

Total time: 12:38:35

Day 170: Mount Washington

15,69 km (9.7 miles)
1860.2 / 2189.8 miles
Stealth campsite, NH

https://youtu.be/9ntg32sDxhE

During the night it rained heavily. And although my tent spot was atrocious in all scales, I had still been able to pick a place where the water wouldn’t be flowing into. I got up earlier than usual, because I was trying to do 15 miles and get the Presidential traverse done. In addition I was planning to dine at the Mount Washington.

The first hut that I passed in the morning was the Mizpah Spring Hut where I filled my water bottle. From there begun the climbing. The trail to Mount Pierce was steep, but then the uphill changed to more gentle. The AT doesn’t traverse all the summits of the Presidentials, but that can be done following the side trails. For me it was now more important to take the AT than to go peakbagging. That meant I passed Mount Eisenhower, climbed over Mount Franklin and passed Mount Monroe. As I had expected there were lots of day hikers and weekenders, because it was Saturday.

When I arrived to the Lakes of the Clouds Hut that sits right beneath Mount Washington, I decided to have a lunch break. I was thinking that the soup might give a nice push for the last ascent. The sun had been shining between the clouds every once in a while, when I had been walking above the treeline towards the Lakes of the Clouds. However at the hut I was completely swallowed by the cloud.

After the soup lunch I sat outside to tape my feet. My socks and shoes that were still wet had softened my skin, which caused abrasions all over my feet. Usually I have been using Sealskinz membrane socks when my shoes are wet and thus avoided this problem. But the taller Sealskinz socks that I had ordered from Amazon (to use in the Hanwags that have bigger ankle height than the Oboz) arrived late and I didn’t get them in time for the Whites. I had to deal with what I got.

The climb to the Mount Washington was actually easier than I had expected. The uphill was very similar rocky ”rakka” terrain that we have in Lapland, but not too steep. Intermittently a hole appeared to the surrounding clouds and the sun shone through, but mostly I was hiking in the cloud. Visibility was often only 20 m (65 ft).

Before too long the weather station on the top of Mount Washington started to form through the clouds. The warning signs advertised the ”worst weather on the planet”, that I presumed were indicating the erratic weather and the record breaking windspeed of 372 km/h (231 mph). I had expected to see a tourist crowd, but I was still surprised by the amount of people lounging near the summit. The horde that had been hauled up the hill with the cog wheel train were standing in line to have their photo taken on the summit.

I went to the snack bar to grab a couple slices of pizza and a sandwich. I retreated with my food from the noisy restaurant to the hikers’ backpack room in basement. There were also few tables and outlets that I could use to charge my phone and power bank. The building has a small post office where you can mail cards and get a special Mount Washington stamp on them. So, I decided to write a few cards while I was eating.

After five I started to push through the clouds and down the mountain. I crossed the rails of the cog wheel train and the AT then followed the rails for a while. One of the AT traditions is that the hikers are mooning to the people sitting on the train. This gesture, that doesn’t fit the Americal culture that is horrified by any kind of nudity, has been killed off by catching and prosecuting the hikers. I was too afraid for my visa to flash my derrière to the train passing by.

The descent was as rocky as the climb up had been. When I passed Mount Clay the sheet of clouds was finally ripping off and I was able to see some views. The summit of Mount Washington was still in the clouds though.

I had planned to try to get to the treeline, because camping above it is restricted to protect the vegetation. I knew that this meant some night hiking, but my energy levels were good. However I was caught off-guard by an issue that was provoked by my wet shoes and socks. The soggy skin was friable and especially my toes were somehow swollen. This resulted a constant chafing against the shoe. What was an uncomfortable feeling in the beginning started to change quite fast to such as someone would be rubbing my toes with a cheese grater. When the pain grew unbearable the walking was also impossible. I tried to pull my socks straight, loosen my hiking boots and all that jazz, but my toes were in pain.

While I was passing Mount Jefferson I had to admit that I couldn’t go much further with these feet. My options were to continue hiking in Crocs, which didn’t sound like a good idea in the rocky terrain, or to bivy above the treeline and hope that the swelling would be gone in the morning. I decided to pitch my tent.

I looked for a place where the vegetation would be least fragile and found a grassy spot that could just fit my tent. The trash on the ground indicated that some hikers had had their lunch break there. I also considered to descend a short distance to Edmands Col. I was reasoning though, that the hillside would offer me better shield from the wind and the col might actually turn into a wind tunnel.

Like my campsite last night, this was also anything but flat. Still I was able to even it out by stuffing my hiking pants underneath the mattress. I took off the wet socks and saw that my toes truly were swollen and completely red. Many of them were developing deep blisters. One toenail was about to fall off. The situation didn’t seem very encouraging, but there was nothing else to do than to wish that my feet would be in better condition in the morning.

“I have climbed mountains
I have lost my toes
I don’t mind
Now I’m alone”
-Cocoon
(Cliffhanger, 2007)

JFRM-2017-08-0395.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0397.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0400-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0404.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0405.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0406.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0407.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0409.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0410.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0411.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0412.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0413.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0414.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0415.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0416.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0417.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0421.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0422.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0423.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0425.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0427.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0429.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0430.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0432.jpg

Yöllä oli satanut rankasti. Ja vaikka telttapaikkani oli kaikin puolin surkea, olin kuitenkin sen verran osannut valita, etten olisi veden valuma-alueella. Nousin tavallista aikaisemmin, koska yrittäisin tehdä noin 15 mailia ja saada Presidential rangen poikkikulun tehtyä. Lisäksi suunnitelmissa oli syödä Mount Washingtonilla.

Ohitin ensimmäiseksi aamulla Mizpah Spring Hutin, jossa kävin täyttämässä vesipulloni. Sitten alkoi nousu. Mount Piercelle vievä polku oli jyrkkä, mutta sen jälkeen ylämäet olivat maltillisempia. AT ei kulje kaikkien presidenttien huippujen yli, vaikka sekin on mahdollista tehdä sivupolkujen kautta. Itselleni oli kuitenkin nyt tärkeämpää kulkea AT:a pitkin kuin kerätä huippuja. Ohitin siten Mount Eisenhowerin, ylitin Mount Franklinin ja ohitin Mount Monroen. Kuten olin arvellut, oli reiteillä paljon päivä- ja viikonloppuvaeltajia, koska oli lauantai.

Tullessani Mount Washingtonin juurella olevalle Lakes of the Clouds Hutille päätin pitää lounastauon ja käydä syömässä keittoa. Ajattelin sen antavan hieman vauhtia viimeiseen nousuun. Aurinko oli ajoittain paistanut pilvien lomasta kulkiessani puurajan yläpuolella kohti Lakes of the Cloudsia. Majalle tullessani kuitenkin päädyin täysin pilven nielaisemaksi.

Keiton syötyäni teippailin hieman jalkojani. Eilisen jäljiltä märät sukat ja kengät olivat pehmittäneet ihoa, mistä seurasi hiertymiä vähän joka puolelle jalkaterää. Yleensä olen käyttänyt märissä kengissä Sealskinz-kalvosukkia ja siten onnistunut välttämään tämän ongelman. Nyt kuitenkin Amazonista tilaamani pidempivartiset (Obozin kenkiä korkeavartisimpiin Hanwageihin sopivat) Sealskinzit olivat olleet myöhässä ja en ollut niitä saanut. Oli selvittävä sillä mitä oli.

Nousu Mount Washingtonille oli lopulta helpompi kuin olin odottanut. Rinne oli hyvin samanlaista rakka-kivikkoa kuin Lapissa, mutta ei mitenkään jyrkkää. Hetkittäin taivasta peittävään pilvimassaan tuli reikä ja aurinko pilkahti esiin, mutta pääasiassa kuljin pilven sisällä. Näkyvyys oli hetkittäin vain noin 20 m.

Ennen pitkää alkoi pilven läpi hahmottua Mount Washingtonin laella oleva sääasema ja pian muitakin rakennuksia. Varoituskyltit kertoivat alueella olevan “maailman huonoin sää”, millä varmaankin viitattiin vuoren nopeasti vaihteleviin sääoloihin ja siellä mitattuihin maailman kovimpiin tuuliin. Olin odottanut näkeväni turistilauman, mutta silti yllätyin vuoren laella olevasta väenpaljoudesta. Junalla paikalle tulleet ihmiset seisoivat pitkässä jonossa ottaakseen itsestään kuvan vuoren huipulla.

Hain snack barista pari siivua pizzaa ja täytetyn leivän. Pakenin eväideni kanssa meluisasta ravintolasalista alakerran huoneeseen, joka oli periaatteessa vaeltajien reppujen säilytystä varten, mutta sielläkin oli pari pöytää. Sain samalla laitettua myös kännykän ja powerbankin lataukseen. Rakennuksessa on pikkuinen postitoimisto, josta voi lähettää kortteja saaden niihin Mount Washington -leiman. Niinpä päätin syömisen ohessa kirjoittaa myös muutaman kortin.

Lähdin ennen viittä tunkemaan pilven läpi alas vuorelta. Ylitin hammasratasjunan raiteet ja AT kulki jonkin aikaa radan viertä. Yksi AT:n traditioista on, että vaeltajat vilauttavat junassa matkustaville turisteille takapuolensa. Tämä amerikkalaiseen alastomuutta kauhistelevaan kulttuuriin sopimaton ele on kuitenkin kitketty ottamalla vaeltajia kiinni ja sakottamalla heitä. Viisumin palamisen pelossa en siis uskaltautunut paljastamaan pakaroitani ohi kulkevan junan matkustajille.

Laskeutuminen oli yhtä louhikkoista kuin nousukin oli ollut. Kulkiessani Mount Clayn ohi alkoi pilviin ilmestyä aukkoja ja hetkittäin aloin nähdä hieman maisemiakin. Mount Washingtonin huippu pysyi kuitenkin pilven sisällä.

Olin ajatellut yrittää puurajalle asti, koska sen yläpuolella telttailua on rajoitettu kasvien suojelemiseksi. Tiesin edessä olevan siten yövaellusta, mutta energiatasoni oli hyvä. Minut kuitenkin pääsi yllättämään eilen kastuneiden kenkien ja sukkien provosoima vaiva. Märkä iho oli haurastunut sekä lisäksi erityisesti varpaani olivat jotenkin turvonneet. Tästä seurauksena varpaat alkoivat hiertää kenkää vasten. Aluksi epämiellyttävä tuntemus alkoi nopeasti muuttua sellakseksi kuin joku hinkkaisi varpaitani juustoraastimella. Kivun tullessa sietämättömäksi kävelystä alkoi tulla mahdotonta. Yritin oikoa sukkia, löysätä kenkiä ja vaikka mitä, mutta varpaisiin sattui.

Ohittaessani Mount Jeffersonia jouduin toteamaan, etten pääsisi näillä jaloilla enää pitkälle. Vaihtoehtoina olisi jatkaa Crocseissa, mikä ei tuntunut erityisen hyvältä vaihtoehdolta kivikossa, tai telttailla puurajan yläpuolella ja toivoa turvotuksen laskevan aamuksi. Päätin iskeä teltan pystyyn.

Etsin rinteestä paikan, jossa kasvusto olisi vähiten haurasta ja löysin juuri ja juuri telttani kokoisen ruoholäntin, jossa roskista päätellen jotkut vaeltajat olivat istuneet tauolla. Harkitsin myös laskeutumista hieman alemmas Edmands Coliin. Päättelin kuitenkin, että vuoren rinteessä saisin enemmän suojaa tuulelta kuin mahdollisesti tuulitunneliksi muuttuvassa vuorten välisessä satulassa.

Edellisen yön telttapaikan tavoin tämäkin oli epätasainen, mutta sain kuoppaisuutta hieman kompensoitua työntämällä vaellushousuni patjan alle. Riisuin kosteat sukat ja sain todeta varpaiden todellakin olevan turvoksissa sekä punoittavat väriltään. Moneen oli syntymässä syvällä olevia rakkoja. Yhdestä varpaasta oli irtoamassa kynsi. Tilanne ei tuntunut oikein rohkaisevalta, mutta en voinut oikein muuta kuin toivoa jalkojen olevan paremmassa kunnossa aamulla.

“I have climbed mountains
I have lost my toes
I don’t mind
Now I’m alone”
-Cocoon
(Cliffhanger, 2007)

Map

Total time: 12:19:36

Day 169: Mount Jackson

15,69 km (9.7 miles)
1849.9 / 2189.8 miles
Stealth campsite, NH

https://youtu.be/TRT2uwapMPs

The rain started in the morning when I was waking up. I was tempted to just stay in my tent and avoid the day in rain, but slowly my sense of duty exceeded my sense of comfort. There was miles to do.

Packing up the tent is a truly annoying process when it’s raining. I was trying to pour out the puddle that was forming on the tent, but it was all the time raining more. In the end I stood with the rolled tent between my thighs and succeeded to squeeze most of the water out of that green and yellow burrito.

I was wishing that I could be able to keep my shoes dry. That wishful thinking was about to die sooner rather than later. Even though my rain gear kept me relatively dry, the bushes on the trail side brushed my pants wet and that got my socks and eventually my shoes wet, too.

The beginning of the day’s trek was pretty flat and I would have been able to hike fast, but the rain had changed the AT into a chain of puddles. The descent to Crawford Notch was less steep and painless that I had expected, though. I had my lunch in the notch while it was not raining and continued to the uphill wishing that the rain was gone for good.

Once again, wishful thinking. When I had ascended the first part of the uphill with nice speed – and in the process got my clothes to dry a bit – the rain started again. It felt exhausting and frustrating to get wet again. And the uphill was getting steeper and rockier. Everything was somehow heavy and agonising. I was huffing and swearing.

I hadn’t got really any service on my phone for few days. I tried once again when I sat down for a while at a view, where there really was no view through the clouds. I got one bar and checked my Facebook. My brother and his wife had used the FB safety check to inform that they were safe during the attack in Turku. What attack in Turku? What is there happening in Finland? The bad connection didn’t allow me to load any news sites and my battery was dying. In my own Facebook I asked my friends to tell me what is happening in Turku, because this seemed be the only thing that was working over the weak service.

I continued my ascent to Mount Webster. There was more and more steep rock faces where I really had to climb. The rain had made everything slippery and climbing took a lot of effort. More huffing, puffing and swearing.

A bit later I was able to get some service again. My friends and brother had told on Facebook that a man had stabbed eight people in downtown Turku. Two of them were dead. It seemed not to be an act of terrorism, but no one really knew yet. The police had shot the man in leg and caught him.

These news from home were nothing to lift up the overall depressing mood of the day. I was sloshing towards Mount Jackson and started to look for a tent spot. I had seen several good spots close to Mount Webster and expected there to be more.

Well, I expected wrong. The forest was sloping, dense and against all sense also swampy at the same time. There was no way to fit a tent to this uneven tree filled wetland. The sun was setting and it was getting dark. I was wet and exhausted. I just wanted to get somewhere, anywhere to sleep. I crossed an alpine bog over the bog bridges and found an open flat site. I was joying that I finally found my tent site until I saw that someone had used this only flat and open spot as their latrine. I cursed this surface shitter to the lowest level of Dante’s inferno.

There was nothing else to do, but keep on looking. At some point I stopped to dig out my head torch. I really didn’t want to do second long day in a row, especially when tomorrow I had to get up early. I had the Presidential traverse ahead of me. This group of mountains is named after different presidents of United States and in the middle of it is Mount Washington. This almost 2000er (6000 footer) is known of its rapidly changing weather and extremely high winds. And most of this traverse should be done in one day.

Eventually I saw a small spot, just maybe large enough to fit my tent, right next to the trail. There was a pothole, rocks, roots and everything, but I had to try. I was horribly tired. I succeeded pitching my tent into that spot that was so uneven that it must have been the shittiest tent site of the whole thru-hike. I took off my soaking wet shoes and socks. The skin of my hands and feet was wrinkled by the wet conditions and it was tearing off in large sheets. I felt relieved to put on dry clothes. Still I was painfully aware that in the morning I would have to put those wet shoes back on. I laid me down on my mattress where I kept on sliding all the time to some direction. I would have rather been anywhere else.

“Još te ne dam maglama sa planina
Još te ne dam vodama iz dubina
A ti kažeš pusti me, živ mi bio
Zaboravu predaj me, sad adio”
-Knez
(Adio, 2015)

 

“I still don’t give you to the mists of the mountains
I still don’t give you to the depths of the water
And you ask me to let you go, forever
To sink you into oblivion and say goodbye”
-Knez
(Adio, 2015)

JFRM-2017-08-0390.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0391.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0392.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0394.jpg

Sade alkoi aamulla heräillessäni. Minua houkutteli jäädä vain lepäämään telttaani ja välttää sadepäivä, mutta pikkuhiljaa velvollisuudentuntoni voitti mukavuudenhaluni. Olisi maileja tehtävänä.

Teltan pakkaaminen oli ärsyttävää sateessa. Yritin kaadella muodostuvaa lätäkköä pois teltan päältä kasatessani sitä, mutta vettä ehti sataa aina lisää. Lopulta puristin reisieni välissä rullattua telttaani onnistuen valuttamaan tuosta vihreänkeltaisesta burritosta melkoisen määrän vettä.

Elättelin toiveita siitä, että kenkäni säilyisivät kuivana. Ne toiveet eivät kuitenkaan eläneet pitkään. Vaikka sadevarusteet pitivät minut muuten melko kuivana, kastuivat housujen lahkeet ympäröivästä pusikosta ja sitä myötä sukat ja kengät.

Alkumatka oli melko tasaista ja polku olisi ollut nopeakulkuista ellei sade olisi muuttanut AT:a ketjuksi lätäköitä. Laskeutuminen Crawford Notchiin oli onneksi loivempi ja kivuttomampi kuin olin odottanut. Söin notkon pohjalla sateen hetkeksi tauotessa ja jatkoin ylämäkeen toivoen sateen jo kokonaan loppuneen.

Toiveajattelua. Noustuani reippaasti ylämäen alkuosan ja saatua samalla vaatteeni melko kuiviksi alkoi sade taas uudestaan. Tuntui väsyttävältä ja turhauttavalta kastua taas. Samalla nousu muuttui kokoajan jyrkemmäksi ja kivikkoisemmaksi. Kaikki oli jotenkin raskasta ja ahdistavaa. Puuskutin ja kiroilin.

Kännykässä ei ollut ollut kenttää pariin päivään. Kokeilin taas kerran istahtaessani hetkeksi näköalapaikalle, josta ei pilven läpi ollut minkäänlaista näköalaa. Onnistuin saamaan yhden tolpan kenttää ja vilkaisin Facebookia. Veljeni ja hänen vaimonsa olivat ilmoittaneet FB:n toiminnolla olevansa turvassa Turun hyökkäykseen liittyen. Mikä Turun hyökkäys? Mitä Suomessa on tapahtunut? Hatara yhteys ei jaksanut ladata uutissivuja ja akku hupeni silmissä. Pyysin omassa Facebookissani ystäviä kertomaan mitä Turussa tapahtuu, koska tämä väylä näytti toimivan heikolla yhteydellä parhaiten.

Jatkoin nousua kohti Mount Websteriä. Edessä oli jatkuvasti enemmän jyrkkiä kallioita, joissa sai todella kiivetä. Sateen vuoksi joka paikka oli liukas ja kulkeminen vaivalloista. Lisää puuskutusta, ähkimistä ja kiroilua.

Saadessani hieman myöhemmin taas hetkeksi kenttää kännykkään sain tietää ystävieni ja veljeni välityksellä, että Turussa oli joku mies puukottanut kahdeksaa ihmistä keskustassa. Kaksi oli kuollut. Ilmeisesti kyseessä ei ollut terrorismi, mutta asiasta ei ollut vielä kovin tarkkoja tietoja. Poliisi oli ampunut tekijää jalkaan ja saanut tämän kiinni.

Uutiset kotimaasta eivät mitenkään erityisesti nostaneet päivän masentavaa mielialaa. Rämmin kohti Mount Jacksonia ja aloin katsella mahdollista telttapaikkaa. Olin nähnyt useita hyviä paikkoja lähellä Mount Websteriä, joten ajattelin lisää olevan varmasti tarjolla.

No, ajattelin hyvin väärin. Metsä oli jatkuvasti mäkistä, tiivistä ja vastoin kaikkea järkeä myös samalla soista. Epätasaiseen kosteikkoryteikköön ei saisi telttaa minnekään. Aurinko laski ja alkoi hämärtää. Olin märkä ja uupunut. Halusin vain saada itseni jonnekin yöksi. Ylitin pitkospuita pienen suoalueen ja sen vierestä löytyi avoin paikka. Ehdin jo iloita telttapaikan löytymisestä, kunnes huomasin jonkun käyttäneen tätä ainoaa tasaista ja avointa kohtaa käymälänään. Kirosin tämän surface shitterin, pintapaskojan, alimpaan helvettiin.

Ei auttanut kuin jatkaa etsintöjä. Jossain vaiheessa pysähdyin kaivamaan repustani otsalampun nähdäkseni pimeässä. En olisi millään halunnut tehdä toista pitkään venyvää päivää putkeen, kun huomenna olisi mahdollisesti aikainen herätys. Edessä olisi niin kutsuttu Presidential traverse eli Presidential rangen poikkikulku. Tämä vuorijono koostuu Yhdysvaltain presidenttien mukaan nimetyistä vuorista ja sen keskellä on Mount Washington. Tuo hieman alle paritonninen vuori on kuuluisa vaihtelevasta säästä ja kovista tuulista. Ja suurin osa tästä poikkikulusta pitäisi yrittää tehdä yhdessä päivässä.

Lopulta näin polun vieressä pienen, ehkä juuri ja juuri telttani kokoisen aukon metsässä. Siinä oli kuoppaa, kiveä ja juurakkoa, mutta pakko oli yrittää. Olin hirveän väsynyt. Sain tungettua teltan koloon, joka epätasaisuudessaan oli varmasti koko reissun huonoin telttapaikka. Riisuin märät kengät ja sukat. Sekä kämmenten että jalkojen iho oli kosteudesta ruttuinen ja irtoili laajoina laattoina. Kuivat vaatteet olivat helpotus. Olin kuitenkin kivuliaan tietoinen, että aamulla pitäisi vetää taas märät kengät jalkaan. Kävin pitkälleni makuualustalle, jossa valuin kokoajan johonkin suuntaan ja olisin ollut mielummin missä tahansa muualla.

“Još te ne dam maglama sa planina
Još te ne dam vodama iz dubina
A ti kažeš pusti me, živ mi bio
Zaboravu predaj me, sad adio”
-Knez
(Adio, 2015)

 

“I still don’t give you to the mists of the mountains
I still don’t give you to the depths of the water
And you ask me to let you go, forever
To sink you into oblivion and say goodbye”
-Knez
(Adio, 2015)

Map

Total time: 10:08:57

Day 168: South Twin Mountain

17,39 km (10.8 miles)
1839.2 / 2189.8 miles
Stealth campsite, NH

https://youtu.be/yNCpad9-C8U

The morning was chilly. It wasn’t cold in my sleeping bag, but when I got out of there the down coat was the most comfortable choice. I started hiking still wearing my down coat and a beanie, but quite soon the day and my body started to warm up and I was able to go on wearing a t-shirt.

I had decided to stop at the Galehead Hut to have the lunch soup and the AT seemed not to have any significant climbs before that. Well, there was no significant climbs, but small ups and downs all the time. Enough to slow me down more than I had expected.

I arrived to the hut a bit after noon and contently suffed my face with two bowls of potato dill soup. I have had a couple of visits to the hospital that had made any cream soup to taste repulsive, but this hodgepodge sunk in without complaints. My constant hunger might have had its effect and perhaps this soup was somewhat more tasty than the ones that they serve in a hospital.

In the White Mountains there is a network of these huts that are maintained by the Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC). AMC is also known by the nickname Appalachian Money Club, because staying in the hut is ridiculously expensive – more than hundred dollars a night. Even though this includes the dinner and the breakfast, I have paid a lot less staying in the huts in the Alps. Even in Switzerland that is known to be expensive. The AMC huts are not the choice for a budget traveller, but they do offer a possibility to do work-for-stay. As far as I know the WFS means couple hours of work and you get to sleep on the floor and eat the leftovers of dinner and breakfast. But to get a WFS you need to be at the hut quite early and that doesn’t fit my schedules, because I prefer to hike late. Anyway the huts do have something for me too, because they offer the cheap lunch soup, potable water and a privy.

From the hut started the steep uphill to South Twin Mountain. I was climbing slowly up the rocky slope to the windy summit. The descent was in the beginning as steep as the ascent had been, but slowly it changed to more gentle. I marched downhill towards the Zealand Falls Hut. I knew that there would be a few tent sites nearby. When I reached the hut it was coming dark and I put my head torch on.

Soon I found the first tent site, but it was already full. Well, I just continued on to the deepening dark. Also the next tent site was taken. I checked the Guthook app and learned that two miles further there would be more tent sites. There was nothing else to do than to keep on trucking to the darkness. Luckily the AT was very flat here and I was hiking fast. It was clear that I would not drop in on any unknown tent sites, because on the other side there was a rock face and on the other side a steep slope down.

I was tired and I just wanted to sleep. Finally I arrived close to the Thoreau Falls and found the tent spot that I had been looking for. It wasn’t especially spacious, but I was able to fit my tent there and relieved I sat inside. In the middle of the darkness my own little reality felt like a really lonely place.

“Joskus me eksytään yksin pimeään
Huudetaan kunnes itketään
Sanat on turhia eikä ne tuu riittämään
Annan mun rakkauden enkä pyydä mitään
En oo unohtanu sitä mitä sanoin
En oo luovuttanu siitä minkä vannoin
Ja jos sanoinkin sen ääneen liian harvoin,
Niin sua jatkuvasti mielessäni kannoin

Täällä mä oon, vieläkin sun
Nousen pystyyn jos kaadun
Haluun saada syttyyn sun soihdun
Sun hymystä mä voimaannun
Ja täällä mä oon niin kauan kun
viimeisen kerran kaadun
Jos sä haluut sotilaan mä varustaudun
Jos haluut rauhaa mä antaudun”
-Reino Nordin
(Antaudun, 2017)

 

“Sometimes we get lost alone in the dark
Screaming until we are crying
The words are useless and they won’t be enough
I give my love and I won’t ask for anything
I haven’t forgot what I said
I haven’t given up for what I vowed
And even if I said it out loud too seldom
I constantly carried you in my mind

Here I am, still yours
I get up if I fall
I want to light up your torch
I am empowered by your smile
And here I am as long until
I fall for the last time
If you want a soldier, I gear up
If you want peace, I surrender”
-Reino Nordin
(Antaudun, 2017)

JFRM-2017-08-0359.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0361-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0368.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0369.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0370-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0380.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0381.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0382.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0384.jpg

Aamu oli viileä. Minulla ei ollut kylmä makuupussissani, mutta sieltä ulos tultuani tuntui mukavimmalta vaihtoehtolta vetää untuvatakki päälle. Lähdin vaeltamaankin untuvatakissa ja pipossa, mutta hyvin pian sekä päivä että kehoni alkoi lämmetä, jonka jälkeen tarkenin taas hyvin t-paidassa.

Olin päättänyt pysähtyä Galehead Hutilla lounaskeitolla ja olin katsellut AT:n olevan sinne asti vailla suurempia korkeuseroja. No, suuria vaihteluita ei ollut, mutta pientä kapuamista koko ajan siinä määrin, etten edennyt ollenkaan niin nopeasti kuin olin ajatellut.

Tulin kuitenkin vähän puolenpäivän jälkeen majalle ja vedin hyvillä mielin kaksi lautasellista peruna-tilli -keittoa. Olen kehittänyt parin sairaalakokemuksen jälkeen vastenmielisyyden sosekeittoja kohtaan, mutta nyt tämä soossi upposi aivan ongelmitta. Nälkä oli ehkä osatekijänä ja ehkä keitossa oli myös enemmän makua kuin sairaalan sörsseleissä.

White Mountainsilla on siis AMC:n eli Appalachian Mountain Clubin ylläpitämä majaverkosto. Yhdistys on saanut myös pilkkanimen Appalachian Money Club, koska majojen yöpymishinnat ovat omastakin mielestäni aika kohtuuttomia – reilusti yli sata dollaria yö. Vaikka tähän sisältyykin illallinen ja aamiainen niin olen päässyt huomattavasti halvemmalla alppien majoilla. Jopa kalliissa Sveitsissä. AMC:n majat eivät siis ole ehkä budjettimatkailijan suosiossa, mutta ne kuitenkin tarjoavat läpivaeltajille work-for-stay -mahdollisuutta. WFS sisältää tietääkseni pari tuntia työtä majalla ja vastineeksi saa nukkua majan lattialla sekä syödä ilta- ja aamuruuan ylijäämät. Kuitenkin halutessan tehdä WFS:ta pitää majalla olla aikaisin ja siten se ei sovi omaan tapaani vaeltaa pitkään illalla. Mutta joka tapauksessa majat tarjoavat kaltaiselleni ohikulkijallekin tuota edullista lounaskeittoa sekä juomavettä ja mukavuuslaitoksen.

Majalta alkoi jyrkkä nousu South Twin Mountainille. Kiipesin hitaasti kallioista rinnettä tuuliselle huipulle. Laskeutuminen oli aluksi yhtä jyrkkää kuin nousukin, mutta lopulta rinne muuttui loivemmaksi. Marssin alamäkeä kohti Zealand Falls Hutia, jonka lähellä oli tiedossani parikin telttapaikkaa. Majalle saapuessani alkoi tulla hämärä, joten kaivoin otsalampun valmiiksi esiin.

Pian löysinkin telttapaikan, mutta siellä oli jo väkeä. No, jatkoin syvenevässä pimeässä kohti seuraavaa. Myös tämä paikka oli vallattu. Vilkaisin Guthook-sovellusta ja ainakin parin mailin päässä oli sen mukaan telttapaikka. Ei auttanut muu kuin painaa menemään läpi pimeyden. Onneksi AT oli todella tasainen ja etenin vauhdilla. Oli selvää, ettei mitään yllätystelttapaikkoja olisi tarjolla, koska toisella puolellani nousi kallioseinämä ja toisella puolella oli jyrkkä rinne alas.

Minua väsytti ja halusin vain päästä nukkumaan. Lopulta saavuin Thoreau Fallsin lähelle ja löysinkin etsimäni telttapaikan. Tilaa oli hieman niukasti, mutta sain telttani pystyyn ja helpottuneena istuin sen sisälle. Oma pieni todellisuuteni pimeän keskellä tuntui yksinäiseltä paikalta.

“Joskus me eksytään yksin pimeään
Huudetaan kunnes itketään
Sanat on turhia eikä ne tuu riittämään
Annan mun rakkauden enkä pyydä mitään
En oo unohtanu sitä mitä sanoin
En oo luovuttanu siitä minkä vannoin
Ja jos sanoinkin sen ääneen liian harvoin,
Niin sua jatkuvasti mielessäni kannoin

Täällä mä oon, vieläkin sun
Nousen pystyyn jos kaadun
Haluun saada syttyyn sun soihdun
Sun hymystä mä voimaannun
Ja täällä mä oon niin kauan kun
viimeisen kerran kaadun
Jos sä haluut sotilaan mä varustaudun
Jos haluut rauhaa mä antaudun”
-Reino Nordin
(Antaudun, 2017)

Map

Total time: 10:52:01

Day 167: Franconia Ridge

16,43 km (10.2 miles)
1827.2 / 2189.8 miles
Stealth campsite, NH

https://youtu.be/GXITtVj8snM

In the White Mountains there are two sections where one would wish for a good weather: Franconia Ridge and Mount Washington. Both are of course more scenic on a sunny day, but both can be dangerous on a bad weather.

My wish was about to come true considering Franconia Ridge. When I woke up in the morning after a restless night, the mountains were covered with clouds, but the weather forecast was showing clear skies for the afternoon. I took a shuttle with few other hikers from The Notch Hostel back to the AT and started the long uphill.

I was sitting on a rock having a break when a day hiker passed me. The man stopped to ask if I was a thru-hiker. He told me that he would like to do some trail magic, but he didn’t have any food with him. To my big surprise he then dug out his wallet and handed me a $20 bill. Astonished I thanked the man and decided to use the money for food – in the spirit of trail magic.

After ascending more than 1000 vertical meters (3300 ft) I reached the first summit of the day, Little Haystack Mountain. From there started the Franconia Ridge that traversed over the Mount Lincoln and Mount Lafayette above the treeline. The clouds were gone and the views on the ridge were great. The AT follows the ups and downs of the ridge and climbs to the more than 1600 m (5200 ft) high summit of Mount Lafayette.

When the ridge offered some cover from the wind the weather felt actually quite hot, but mostly there was a strong wind. The views were quite certainly the most astounding on the AT and I got to enjoy the beautiful scenery the whole traverse. It reminded me of my many great experiences on ridge climbing in the Alps: the summit ridge of Grossglockner, the Watzmann traverse, climbing to Hoher Göll and especially traversing the Jubiläumsgrat. The Franconia Ridge was not technically difficult like these ones, but still a scenic ridge anyway.

Arriving to the summit of Mount Lafayette I met my friend Mojo. We spent a while together until he started to descend and stayed to have my lunch break on the summit.

Mojo had told me that he was heading to the shelter that was on the north side of Mount Garfield. My initial goal was to reach a pond that was on the south side of the mountain, but I was thinking that if I had enough time I could go over the mountain, too.

While I was descending from the Mount Lafayette two women wearing day hiking gear passed me. In my mind I was wondering where they were going, because as far as I knew there was really nothing ahead of us. Considerably later I reached these women when they were just about to turn back after reaching two thru-hikers. These men told me that the women were heading to Mount Lafayette and had ended up going the wrong direction. We were thinking that they had no possibility whatsoever to get down from the mountain before dark. And we didn’t know if they had a head torch with them. It was likely that they had cell phones anyway. When I went on I couldn’t stop thinking that I should have asked their plans already when we first met. Or I could have offered them my head torch and ask them to mail it back to me to Gorham. I could have done without it for a while. Why all the good ideas always come too late? I hope that these women literally got out of the woods safely.

I reached the Garfield Pond before six and decided to throw myself over the Garfield Mountain. It was only 250 vertical meters (820 ft) of climbing, but the both sides of the hill were steep. Now the uphills have once again started to go better, so while listening to the Tuntematon Sotilas (The Unknown Soldier by Väinö Linna) I kept on hauling myself up. From the summit of Mount Garfield there was a breathtaking view to the Franconia Ridge. It felt quite unbelievable that I had walked that distance in one day. All the formations of the terrain was somehow setting to the right scale as I could clearly see my route.

I passed the north side shelter while I was going downhill. I could have stayed there, but I rather wanted to have the downhill done and find my own tent spot. Many of the shelters and campsites on the White Mountains have a fee. And the problem is not the €10 fee, but I preferred to have some peace and quiet.

The downhill was very rocky and steep. And the AT was going along a small stream. Or the other way around – depends how you want to see it. Anyway the water made the rocks slippery and I had to descend very carefully. On the bottom there was a flat section where I had planned to look for a tent spot. I was able to find one just where I had thought. I was happy with my achievements of today even though my feet were sore after the long descent. For the first time in a long while I put on a long sleeve shirt for the night, because it was getting a bit chilly. I had been sleeping in long johns and thicker socks already for a while now. When the darkness fell it was easy to answer the sweet call of my warm sleeping bag.

JFRM-2017-08-0272.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0273.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0275.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0276-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0280-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0283-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0289-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0301.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0302.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0303.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0304.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0305.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0308.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0309.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0311.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0313.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0314-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0322.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0323-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0329.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0330.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0332.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0334.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0335.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0336-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0346.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0347-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0353-Pano.jpg

White Mountainsilla on kaksi kohdetta, jonne erityisesti toivoisi hyvää säätä: Franconia Ridge ja Mount Washington. Molemmat ovat tietysti maisemallisempia aurinkoisena päivänä, mutta molemmat voivat olla vaarallisia paikkoja huonolla säällä.

Toiveeni näytti toteutuvan Franconia Ridgen osalta. Herätessäni levottomasti nukutun yön jälkeen olivat vuoret aamulla pilvessä, mutta sääennuste lupasi selkenevää. Matkustin muutaman muun vaeltajan kanssa The Notch Hostellilta aamun shuttle-kyydillä takaisin AT:lle ja lähdin nousemaan pitkää ylämäkeä.

Istuessani kivellä pitämässä pientä taukoa käveli ohitseni päivävaeltaja. Mies pysähtyi kohdalleni ja kysyi olinko läpivaeltamassa. Hän sanoi haluavansa tehdä trail magicia, mutta hänellä ei ollut ruokaa tarjota. Niinpä hän suureksi yllätyksekseni kaivoi esiin lompakkonsa ja lykkäsi käteeni $20 setelin. Ihmeissäni kiitin miestä ja päätin käyttää rahan trail magicin hengessä ruokaan.

Noustuani reilut 1000 m vertikaalia tulin päivän ensinmäiselle huipulle, Little Haystack Mountainille. Sieltä alkoi puurajan yläpuolella kulkeva Franconia Ridge Mount Lincolnin yli Mount Lafayettelle. Aamun pilvet olivat väistyneet ja näkyvyys harjanteella oli hyvä. AT kulkee harjanteen muotoja noudattaen ylös ja alas, päätyen reilun 1600 m korkeuteen Mount Lafayetten huipulla.

Suojaisissa paikoissa oli jopa kuuma, mutta muuten harjanteella puhalsi voimakas tuuli. Näköalat olivat varmasti näyttävimmät tähän mennessä koko AT:lla ja niitä sai ihailla koko harjanteen poikkikulun ajan. Mieleeni muistui monta hienoa harjannekiipeilykokemusta alpeilla: Grossglocknerin huippuharjanne, Watzmannin poikkikulku, Hoher Göllin nousu ja ennen kaikkea Jubiläumsgratin kiipeäminen. Franconia Ridge ei toki ollut näiden tapaan kiipeilyllisesti haastava, mutta näyttävä harjanne se on silti.

Saapuessani Mount Lafayetten huipulle tapasin ystäväni Mojon. Vietimme hetken aikaa yhdessä huipulla, kunnes hän lähti laskeutumaan minun jäädessä vielä pitämään lounastaukoa.

Mojo oli sanonut aikovansa Mount Garfieldin pohjoispuolella olevalle shelterille. Oma alkuperäinen tavoitteeni oli mennä vähintään kyseisen vuoren eteläpuolella olevalle lammelle, mutta ajattelin ehkä ajan salliessa mennä koko vuoren yli.

Laskeutuessani Mount Lafayettelta ohitseni kulki kaksi päivävaellusvarusteissa olevaa nuorta naista. Ihmettelin mielessäni heidän mentyä ohi, että minneköhän olivat suuntaamassa, kun edessä ei tietääkseni ollut niin sanotusti mitään. Huomattavasti myöhemmin saavutin naiset juuri kun he olivat kääntymässä kaksi muuta läpivaeltajaa tavattuaan takaisinpäin. Sain kuulla näiltä miehiltä naisten kai olleen matkalla Mount Lafayettelle ja menneen jossain väärään suuntaan. Mietimme yhdessä, että naiset eivät kyllä ehtisi alas vuorelta ennen pimeää mitenkään. Emmekä tienneet oliko heillä otsalamppujakaan. Kännykät toivottavasti olivat. Jatkaessani eteenpäin pyöri mielessäni, että olisi pitänyt tiedustella naisten päämäärää jo ensikohtaamisella tai toisaalta olisin voinut lainata heille otsalampun ja pyytää postittamaan sen Gorhamiin. Itse pärjäisin sen aikaa ilmankin. Miksi hyvät ideat tulevat aina myöhässä? Toivottavasti nämä naiset löysivät turvallisesti perille.

Tulin Garfield Pondille ennen kuutta ja päätin heittää itseni vielä Mount Garfieldin yli. Nousua oli vain noin 250 m vertikaalia, mutta rinne oli jyrkkä molemmin puolin. Ylämäet ovat kuitenkin alkaneet sujua, joten Tuntematonta sotilasta kuunnellen tahkosin ylös päin. Mount Garfieldin laelta avautui upea näkymä Franconia Ridgelle. Tuntui aivan uskomattomalta, että olin kulkenut koko näkemäni matkan yhdessä päivässä. Maaston muodot asettuivat jotenkin oikeaan skaalaan, kun näki selkeästi oman reittinsä.

Laskeutuessani kuljin pohjoispuolella olevan shelterin ohi. Olisin toki voinut jäädä sinnekin yöksi, mutta halusin mielummin saada alamäen tehdyksi ja etsiä oman telttapaikan. Monet White Mountainsin sheltereistä ja teltta-alueista ovat maksullisia. Ongelma ei niinkään ollut se, ettenkö olisi voinut yöpymisestä maksaa sen $10, mutta halusin olla omassa rauhassa.

Alamäki olikin todella jyrkkää kivikkoa ja osittain AT kulki pientä puroa pitkin. Tai toisinpäin – miten sen nyt haluaa ajatella. Joka tapauksessa vesi teki kivet liukkaiksi ja yritin laskeutua varovaisesti. Päästyäni alamäen loppuun tulin hieman tasaisemmalle alueelle, josta olin ajatellut etsiä telttapaikkaa. Löysinkin aivan mainion paikan juuri suunnittelemastani kohtaa. Päivän saavutukset tuntuivat hyvältä vaikka jalkaterät olivat hellänä pitkän laskeutumisrupeaman jäljiltä. Puin ensimmäistä kertaa pitkästä aikaa yöksi päälle pitkähihaisen paidan, koska ilta oli selvästi viileä. Pitkät kalsarit ja paksut sukat olin ottanut jo jonkin aikaa sitten yökäyttöön. Pimeän tullen lämpimän makuupussin lempeään kutsuun oli helppo vastata.

Map

Total time: 11:07:01