Day 171: Mount Madison

16,74 km (10.4 miles)
1872.2 / 2189.8 miles
Stealth campsite, NH

“Just waking up in the morning
And to be well,
Quite honest with ya,
I ain’t really sleep well
Ya ever feel like your train of thought’s been derailed?
That’s when you press on – Lee nails
Half the population’s just waitin to see me fail
Yeah right, you’re better off trying to freeze hell
Some of us do it for the females
And others do it for the retail

But I do it for the kids, life threw the towel in on
Every time you fall it’s only making your chin strong
And I’ll be in your corner like Mick, baby, ’til the end
Or when you hear a song from that big lady”
-Gym Class Heroes
(Fighter, 2012)

With the strong wind beating on my tent through the night I barely slept at all. I did trust that my Akto would be able to take the wind, but the noise kept me awake. In the morning my brains were in completely frozen state after two sleepless nights.

While I was going through my morning routine there was two short rain showers. I peaked out of my tent just to learn that all the mountains that I was able to see yesterday and pretty much everything else further than 20 m (65 ft) from me had disappeared inside the cloud. The wind was very strong and I was especially careful taking down my tent – even though I wasn’t in Atlanta anymore, it could have been easily gone with the wind. I kept the tent attached to my backpack or to me or both all the time.

The swelling in my feet was gone and I had changed my socks thinking that possibly chafing seam wouldn’t be at the exactly same spot. My toes were still sore after yesterday, but my feet fit into my shoes and nothing was rubbing. My decision to bivy, emergency camp, seemed right.

Also my choice of camping at the hillside proved to be good. When I descended to Edmands Col it had really changed into a wind tunnel. I was barely able to stand. The wind was waving me like a rag, my clothes were rattling against my body and the humidity densified into small ice crystals on the surface of my down jacket. I felt like someone would have tied me on the top of their car and would be speeding down the highway. I was leaning against the wind, took support from my trekking poles on every step and was thankful of every single gram that I carried in my backpack. Walking through those strong gusts of wind was like riding on a roller coaster and I was spontaneously shouting for joy.

From the whiteout materialised a bearded man, who was walking towards me. This happy hiker shouted that he was Odie, the editor of the Hiker Yearbook. I shouted back that we had met months ago in south and I showed him the bracelet that he gave me. Odie reminded me to send my photo for the Hiker Yearbook when I was done with the trail.

When I arrived to the intersection of multiple trails I had to stop for a while to make sure that I was taking the right trail. While I was standing there I saw a figure coming through the clouds. This unclear figure seemed somehow familiar and finally I was able to recognise him as Mojo. He had stayed the night at a shelter that was a bit further off the AT. We started to hike together downhill towards the Madison Spring Hut.

At the hut the croo was still cleaning up after the breakfast, so there was no lunch soup yet, but some pretty dry coffee cake anyway. I heard that the croo had allowed many hikers to camp outside the hut last night. It seemed like I wasn’t the only one who had been struggling. From the weather forecasts I finally learned that the wind today was 65-80 km/h or 18-22 m/s (40-50 mph) with 100 km/h or 27 m/s (60 mph) gusts. My gut feeling of the highway speeds wasn’t that inaccurate. The forecast was showing that the weather should clear out in the afternoon.

There was still the climb to the Mount Madison before I was going to finish the Presidential traverse for good. Tailing Mojo I started to push myself once again against the wind and uphill. Every once in a while the clouds started to open, but the wind was still strong. When I reached the summit I had to really balance on the rocky ridge in order not to be knocked down by the wind.

When I got to the downhill the wind was finally easing up. Slowly the fine view to Pinkham Notch started to open in front of me as I got myself below the clouds. It was also getting warmer as I proceeded to lower elevation. I was able take off my down jacket and beanie when the sun finally found me.

The beginning of the downhill was quite steep, but it changed more gentle. Still it was steep enough that I had to keep on looking at my feet all the time. This is why I didn’t see a tree that had fallen over the trail. The trunk of the tree was high enough that it didn’t cause me any danger. But from that trunk there was poking stumps of branches that had been cut and one of them pointed straight at me. I didn’t notice this until the stump hit first on my forehead and then it smashed my glasses to my face. I stopped to evaluate my injuries. Forehead was throbbing and there would be a bump. My glasses were a bit bent, but not broken. I realised that was I not wearing my glasses the branch would have landed straight into my eye. And I would have lost an eye.

Soon after this incident the terrain started to get more flat and first time in a long while I got my good hiking speed on. I was content having the Presidentials behind me and my hiking-confidence seemed to be growing.

Coming to Pinkham Notch I saw Mojo sitting close to the Visitor Center. I heard that the dinner buffet there was expensive, but the store had some snacks available. I grabbed a few chocolate bars for nothing else felt inviting. As I stepped out I saw another friend – AT-AT Walker had decided to stay the night at the hostel next to the Visitor Center. She had already had a chance to take a shower and to change some clean clothes on and she was looking like a normal person. Or maybe even attractive. We were talking for a while and I told her that I was planning to hike on and trying to find a tent site. We thought that we might meet again soon for she was an early riser and might catch me up in the morning.

Me and Mojo started to climb the very steep hill up from Pinkham Notch towards the Wildcat Mountain. The dusk was crawling in when we tried to find tent sites near some outlooks. We found a spot where there was space for one tent and I offered it to Mojo, but he decided to continue on with me. On the next outlook we found another site that had enough space for my tent, but not for Mojo’s larger footprint. It was already dark and I asked Mojo if he was comfortable with me staying here. He didn’t mind and I started to put up my tent as he hiked on. On the last two nights my tent sites had been downright horrible, so I was extremely happy to get to sleep on an even surface.

JFRM-2017-08-0433.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0434.jpg

JFRM-2017-08-0436.jpg
Mojo rising
Mojo nousee

JFRM-2017-08-0445-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0452.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0453.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0454.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0455.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0456.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0458.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0459.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0461-Pano.jpg
JFRM-2017-08-0467-Pano.jpg

“Just waking up in the morning
And to be well,
Quite honest with ya,
I ain’t really sleep well
Ya ever feel like your train of thought’s been derailed?
That’s when you press on – Lee nails
Half the population’s just waitin to see me fail
Yeah right, you’re better off trying to freeze hell
Some of us do it for the females
And others do it for the retail

But I do it for the kids, life threw the towel in on
Every time you fall it’s only making your chin strong
And I’ll be in your corner like Mick, baby, ’til the end
Or when you hear a song from that big lady”
-Gym Class Heroes
(Fighter, 2012)

Voimakkaan tuulen hakatessa telttaani koko yön sain tuskin nukuttua. Luotin kyllä Akton pysyvän pystyssä, mutta meteli oli häiritsevä. Aamulla aivot olivatkin aivan kohmeessa kahden huonosti nukutun yön jälkeen.

Tehdessäni aamutoimia tuli kaksi lyhyttä sadekuuroa. Vilkaisu ulos teltasta kertoi, että vielä illalla näkyneet vuoret ja itseasiassa kaikki lähimmän parinkymmenen metrin sädettä kauempana olevat asiat olivat kadonneet pilven sisälle. Tuuli oli voimakas ja noudatin erityistä varovaisuutta purkaessani telttaa, ettei se olisi lentänyt matkoihinsa. Teltta oli jatkuvasti kiinntettynä reppuun tai minuun ja suurimman osan ajasta molempiin.

Jalkojen turvotus tuntui laskeneen ja olin vaihtanut toiset sukat sillä ajatuksella, että mahdollisen sauman hiertäminen ei osuisi samaan kohtaan. Varpaat olivat vielä hellänä eilisen raastamisen jäljiltä, mutta nyt ne tuntuivat mahtuvan kenkiin ja mikään ei hiertänyt. Päätköseni bivittää, hätämajoittua, oli siis ollut oikea.

Samoin oikeaksi osoittautui telttapaikkani valinta rinteessä. Laskeutuessani Edmands Coliin se oli todellakin muuttunut tuulitunneliksi. Pysyin hädin tuskin pystyssä. Tuuli riepotti minua kuin rättiä, vaatteet räpättivät tuulessa vasten kehoani ja ilmassa oleva kosteus tiivistyi pieniksi jääkiteiksi takkini pintaan. Tuntui kuin joku olisi sitonut minut auton katolle ja ajanut täyttä vauhtia moottoritiellä. Nojasin tuulta vasten, otin joka askeleella tukea vaellussauvoistani ja olin kiitollinen jokaikisestä grammasta, jonka reppuni painoi. Voimakkaiden puuskien keskellä käveleminen oli kuin vuoristoratakyytiä ja huusin spontaanisti riemusta.

Näkyvyyden peittävän pilven seasta materialisoitu vastaan tuleva parrakas mies. Iloisella tuulella oleva vaeltaja huusi olevansa Odie, Hiker Yearbookin tekijä. Huusin hänelle takaisin, että olimme tavanneet kuukausia aiemmin etelässä ja näytin häneltä saamani rannekkeen. Odie muistutti minua lähettämään kuvani Hiker Yearbookiin, kun pääsen perille.

Tullessani useamman polun risteykseen pysähdyin hetkeksi varmistaakseni lähteväni oikeaan suuntaan. Siinä seistessäni alkoi pilvien seasta erottua hahmo, joka tuli toista polkua pitkin minua kohti. Epäselvä hahmo näytti jotenkin tutulta ja lopulta tunnistinkin sen olevan Mojo. Hän oli ollut yötä jonkin verran AT:lta sivussa olevalla shelterillä. Lähdimme yhdessä kulkemaan alamäkeen kohti Madison Spring Hutia.

Majalla siivoiltiin vielä aamiaisen jäljiltä, joten lounaskeittoa ei ollut tarjolla, mutta hieman kuivahtanutta kahvikakkua kuitenkin. Kuulin monien vaeltajien telttailleen majan pihalla luvan kanssa, koska ilmeisesti muutkin olivat kohdanneet haasteita laskeutuessaan Presidentialsilta. Sääennusteista sain viimein tietää tuulennopeuden olleen 65-80 km/h eli 18-22 m/s (40-50 mph) ja puuskissa 100 km/h eli 27 m/s (60 mph). Tunteeni moottoritienopeuksista ei siis ollut kovin väärässä. Ennusteiden mukaan sää oli kuitenkin kirkastumaan päin.

Edessä oli vielä nousu Mount Madisonille ennen kuin pääsisin lopullisesti laskeutumaan alas Presidentialseilta. Lähdin Mojon perässä puskemaan taas kerran tuulta vastaan ja ylämäkeen. Hetkittäin pilvet alkoivat jo avautua paikoittain, mutta tuuli oli yhä voimakasta. Saavuttaessani huipun sain todella tasapainoilla kivikkoisella harjanteella etten olisi kaatunut tuulen voimasta.

Alamäkeen päästyäni tuulen vaikutus alkoi viimein helpottaa ja pikku hiljaa päästyäni pilvien alapuolelle alkoi eteeni avautua hieno näkymä Pinkham Notchin suuntaan. Ilma alkoi myös tuntua lämpimämmältä päästyäni alemmas sekä tuulen taannuttua. Saatoin viimein riisua untuvatakin ja pipon auringon alkaessa lämmittää.

Aluksi alamäki oli jyrkempää, mutta se loiveni hieman edetessäni kohti Pinkham Notchia. Sen verran jyrkkää mäki kuitenkin oli, että jouduin katsomaan jatkuvasti jalkoihini kävellessäni. Tämän vuoksi en huomannutkaan polun ylle kaatunutta puuta. Itse puun runko oli poikittain polun yläpuolella ja niin korkealla, ettei siitä ollut minulle vaaraa. Rungosta törötti kuitenkin sahattuja oksantynkiä moneen suuntaan ja yksi suoraan kohti minua. En huomannut tätä ennen kuin oksantynkä jysähti ensin otsaani ja iski sitten silmälasit kasvojani vasten. Pysähdyin tutkimaan vammoja. Otsassa tykytti ja siihen nousisi kuhmu. Silmälasit olivat hieman vääntyneet, mutta ehjät. Tajusin, että jos minulla ei olisi ollut laseja päässä olisi oksa osunut aivan suoraan minua silmään. Ja minulla olisi nyt yksi silmä vähemmän.

Pian tämän tapahtuman jälkeen maasto alkoi vihdoin muuttua tasaisemmaksi ja pääsin pitkästä aikaa taas hyvään vauhtiin. Olin tyytyväinen saatuani Presidentialsit selätettyä ja uskoni omaan vaeltamiseeni tuntui taas kasvavan.

Saapuessani Pinkham Notchiin näin Visitor Centerin pihalla istumassa Mojon. Sain kuulla illallisbuffetin olevan melko kallis, mutta Visitor Centerin kaupassa olisi kuulemma jotain syötävää saatavilla. Kävin hakemassa muutaman suklaapatukan, mutta muuta kiinnostavaa tarjolla ei oikeastaan ollut. Tullessani ulos näin toisenkin tutun, sillä AT-AT Walker oli päättänyt yöpyä viereisessä hostellissa. Hän oli ehtinyt jo käydä suihkussa ja vaihtaa puhtaat vaatteet päällensä, joten hän näytti aivan normaalilta ihmiseltä. Ellei jopa viehättävältä. Keskustelimme hetken aikaa ja kerroin aikovani itse jatkaa vielä jonkun matkaa ja etsiväni sitten telttapaikan. Arvelimme tapaavamme taas pian, koska AT-AT Walker aikaisena herääjänä ottaisi minut todennäköisesti aamulla kiinni.

Lähdin yhdessä Mojon kanssa nousemaan Pinkham Notchista hyvin jyrkkää rinnettä kohti Wildcat Mountainia. Hämärä alkoi jo tulla, kun etsimme ylämäessä olevien näköalapaikkojen läheltä tilaa teltoille. Löysimme paikan, jossa oli tilaa yhdelle teltalle, joten tarjosin sitä Mojolle. Hän kuitenkin päätti jatkaa vielä eteenpäin kanssani. Seuraavalle tasanteelle päästyämme löysimme toisen telttapaikan, johon oma telttani mahtuisi hyvin, mutta Mojon isommalle teltalle ei ollut kunnolla tilaa. Oli jo pimeä, joten kysyin Mojolta haittaisiko häntä, jos jäisin tähän. Hän ei pannut pahakseen, joten ryhdyin teltanpystytyspuuhiin Mojon jatkaessa matkaa. Kahden edellisen yön telttapaikkani olivat olleet perin surkeita, joten olin harvinaisen tyytyväinen saadessani vihdoinkin nukkua tasaisella pinnalla.

Map

Total Time: 12:38:35

One thought on “Day 171: Mount Madison

  1. […] I started to descend the quite steep slope to the saddle, where I once again climbed up to the summit of the Horn. On the way my phone died in the cold, but after a while in my pocket it was revived. And cold it was because for a while there were coming tiny hails or snow. From the Horn there was one more steep downhill to the saddle and even more steep ascend to the Saddleback Junior. Standing on the summit of the Junior I was able to see the beautiful view to the north side too, but the wind was so strong that I really had to struggle to stand up. I hadn’t have a chance to check the wind speeds from the weather forecast, but it was likely quite close to those that I experienced coming down from the Presidential Range. […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply